PTI Blog

  • SOLO BASTON ABCEDARIO & ABCEDARIO DE MANO: OVERVIEW

    Grand Tuhon Gaje told us that he spent one full year as a child learning the Solo Baston Abcedario, learning one set of 12 attacks at a time, building up until he had all 144 techniques in the 12 sets. Let's say he started in January with the first set: 12 strikes learned and practiced over a month's time is not too much for most children to learn. In February, he would warm up with the first set and then begin learning the second set, which was a mirror image of the first set. (This is the general pattern for most of the Abcedarios, as the even numbered sets are the "lead" sets, with the next even numbered set its mirror image).
  • LEARNING THROUGH COMPARISONS SEMINARS (1980 through the present)

    The Learning Through Comparisons principle: There are great benefits to be had for both students and instructors when they experience different ways of solving the same problem. I first saw this during my teacher’s joint seminars in the early 1980s with Eddie Jafri and Guro Dan Inosanto.
  • LEARNING THROUGH COMPARISONS PT 4: Bowie vs Kukri vs Tomahawk

    LEARNING THROUGH COMPARISONS PT 4:
    Comparing speed and power between the Bowie, the Kukri and the Tomahawk. 8 videos with text. Tools used in this essay:  Cold Steel Leatherneck Bowie, Laredo Rubber Trainer, Gurkha Plus Kukri, Rubber Kukri Trainer, Trail Hawk and an Axe Head Cane cut down to the length of a Trail Hawk.
  • WEAPON DISARMS IN THE PEKITI-TIRSIA SYSTEM

    Disarms in Pekiti-Tirsia are not taught as “goal” techniques in a fight. The goal is not to disarm an opponent, but to safely move past him, after reducing (even temporarily) his ability to pose a danger to you. A disarm is simply one tool in your toolbox to help you get to your goal.
  • LEARNING THROUGH COMPARISONS PT 2 DRAWING THE WEAPON

    The purpose of this series is to learn how to learn; ie the teachnique of learning something new. One way human beings do this (especially when young) is by learning through comparisons. In this essay we will examine the differences in drawing three categories of weapons; the bowie, the kukri and the hatchet/tomahawk.

  • Understanding Distance Control and Timing through Drills.

    The main factors that separate beginners from experienced fighters are the latter’s level of understanding of distance control and timing.
    Distance control in striking arts is usually accomplished via footwork: while timing is the ability to use specific elements of fighting at the correct time.
    Getting good at these skills helps you be in the right place, at the right time and using the right tools to accomplish your goals.
  • PEKITI-TIRSIA EMPTY HAND VS KNIFE: OVERVIEW

    The main purpose of Pekiti-Tirsia hand vs knife training is NOT to end the fight against a knife with your bare hands. The purpose of any good hand vs knife system should be to buy you enough time to make the fight your weapon vs his weapon as soon as possible.
  • THE PEKITI WAY: Teaching the Pekiti-Tirsia system, then and now.

    Here are two lesson plans for teaching the Pekiti-Tirsia system; the Classical way, which Grand Tuhon Gaje learned as a child in the Philippines (...
  • Five teaching methods for the martial arts instructor

    This essay will examine five methodologies of teaching techniques and principles for the martial arts instructor. The five methods we will discuss are:

    1.  AUDIO-VISUAL-KINESTHETIC
    2.  4 ACES
    3.  3 SUPERHEROS,
    4.  GO ASK SOCRATES
    5.  STRESS TRAINING
  • How to design a FMA based Self-Defense/Defensive Tactics Drill.

    The drills described in this article come from two sources. The first are the fighting principles found in the Pekiti-Tirsia system of Filipino martial arts. The second are the teaching methods I learned during my time as a defensive tactics instructor for my department.

    I began training in Pekiti-Tirsia in 1975 and began teaching defensive tactics for the NY State Court system in 1987. Both of these have contributed to my understanding of how to teach this material to a wide variety of people. I have tried to structure this article so it can be adapted to any martial arts or defensive tactics program.

  • The “Thought Provoking Process.” Leo Stories Part 3: (AKA “Go ask Grandma.”)

    Grand Tuhon Leo Gaje used to tell us some interesting stories about his training under his grandfather, Conrado Tortal. Several of these were about Conrado’s teaching methods.

    One of these stories that I found the most interesting was about the “Thought Provoking Process.” This was a somewhat Socratic method of teaching, in that a student was asked a question about a subject, rather than being given the answer from the start. It began like this:

  • PTI ADVANCED HAND VS KNIFE: Part 2

    The way I teach Pekiti-Tirsia advanced hand vs knife has evolved over the years.

    When I first learned the system from Grand Tuhon Gaje, hand vs knife was divided into two stages: